National Teacher Appreciation Week: Teachers Matter

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Dear Teachers,

I take every chance I can to share the work of our schools’ excellent educators with the public. You and I both know that no more important profession exists than that of teaching.  I am proud to be a member of this professional community that continuously has advanced civilization since the first teacher stood on the banks of a river drawing “counting” marks in the sand or using cave pictographs and campfire stories to pass on tribal history. As valued community members, teachers have had influence across tens of generations and today’s generation of teachers is no different.

You matter.

I talk to parents every day who relay stories of how a teacher has made a difference for their child. This occurs in school hallways, parking lots, and store aisles.  I hear the stories at PTO gatherings, or on the phone and through handwritten notes, emails, and social media. Just the other day, a parent stopped me at a school activity to comment that her child loves her teacher and still wakes up each morning excited to go to school. A high school parent shared that he suspects his soon-to-graduate senior will miss a teacher who has impacted her life as much she will miss leaving her close friends behind. During the recent We Notice celebration sponsored by the County Student Council, teachers shared letters with me from parents and students including a teacher with a We Notice note from her own child. The letters said “thank you” in different ways. Thank you …  for helping me, looking out for me, teaching me to be a better person, going an extra mile for me.

The stories are different but one message is clear. No matter what else changes, teachers matter.

You matter because you prepare young people for adult life. You created passion in a student who never cared much for science and she pursued a career in medicine. You discovered an interest in music within a child who struggled with reading and he became an extraordinary singer. You modeled that you too  can make a mistake, apologized, and helped a child understand that we are all human. You took your car for a wash on a Saturday at a school club fundraiser and made a day better for teens you teach. You greeted students at the classroom door to help them with a project even when you needed a bathroom break yourself.

The list is endless of what you do for young people. In exchange, you may work two jobs to make ends meet for your young family. After a long day teaching, you take work home every night to be ready for the next day or next week. You pay for school supplies that a student needs but can’t afford. You add granola bars to your own grocery cart to be sure everyone in your class has a snack at break.

You do whatever it takes to help young people be successful in your class.

Your spouses, partners, and friends who don’t work in education notice how hard you work in the evenings from designing lesson plans to grading student work. Your colleagues in education, even those no longer in the classroom, understand exactly what it takes to be an excellent teacher. They know every day you enter school with personal qualities that help you meet the needs of each unique learner – patience, attention, commitment, enthusiasm and care. You study not just the content you must teach well but also how to teach children well. You are a learner yourself.

Many of you remember playing teacher as a child. Some of you were drawn to the profession because you loved school. Others of you chose the profession because school was a struggle and you believed you could help children who most need excellent teachers to find success as learners.

I believe all of you came to the profession and stayed because you believed you could make a difference in the lives of those we serve as learners.

And, many of you, as I do, remember a teacher who inspired us to teach. For me, it was Mrs. Hiers who was my high school biology, chemistry and physics teacher – when she wasn’t serving as the guidance counselor in my very small, rural high school. One day, she handed a biology lab report back to me and shared in her soft voice that I had a real affinity for biology. That sparked possibilities I had never considered before. That comment led eventually to a major in biology and to the beginning of a career I have loved ever since.

Teachers have made a difference in my life from my childhood to this day. And, our world is a better place because each of you chose to believe in the power of teachers to influence young people who grow up to advance civilization.  You pay forward what excellent teachers did for you.

Thank you for choosing to teach.

The World Is at Our Learners’ Fingertips

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Bookless Libraries: A Skyping Session with Texas

contributed by Mr. Keith Ellen, 7th grade language arts, Burley Middle School

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Recently, our Media Specialist, Sarah Severs approached me with an offer to Skype with a librarian in San Antonio, Texas.  The new public library there, Bibliotech, has the distinction of being the country’s first public library to go “book-less.”  The idea was that I would include my 7th grade advanced/honors language arts class would be part of the cross-country conversation.

A Natural Connection to Research

I immediately realized that in order for my students to be active participants in the conversation, they needed to develop a sense of ownership and truly believe their input to be valuable, they needed to become knowledgeable.  This allowed me to make the research process they worked on earlier in the year much more real and practical now.  Using their internet searching skills, students easily found information on the specific library as well as other places who were considering going the same route as Bibliotech.  As they read, they developed questions that were leading and higher order.  At first, they simply recorded any and all questions with little regard to wording.  Students then got in groups and chose the ones they felt were best.  Then, as a class, we worked on editing the best questions and students volunteered to ask the questions during the interview.

Fieldtrip To Texas

Catarina Velasquez, Community Relations Liaison for the library, first lead us on a guided, virtual fieldtrip of the facilities.  We immediately noticed the enormous amount of open space (obviously due to the lack of bookshelves).  We were all very impressed with this immaculate facility.  It was apparent San Antonio spared little expense as everything seemed to be done on a much grander scale.  It’s certainly not your mother’s library!  From the interactive 40 inch touchscreen monitors that are set up for younger children to the gaming area complete with multiple x-box consoles to the computer lab boasting 28 inch monitors attached to 48 Macs that allow the user to switch between Apple’s operating system and Windows.  Of course, as Ms. Velasquez continued her tour, many students were still stuck on the idea of being able to play video games at the library!

A Look Into the Future

As we were debriefing, students and teachers alike began to toss around the ways in which we could incorporate some of the amenities into our school media centers.  One thing getting lots of attention was the ability to “check out” books without an actual trip to the library, something our local public library now incorporates.  Overwhelmingly, the conclusion was reached that whatever path we follow, much thought and consideration should be placed on remember that not everyone learns in the same way.  Many students shared they still enjoy the “comfort” of reading a book the traditional way and they would not want that option to be completely taken away.  I have to agree, although there are many benefits of going partially digital as well.

Skyping Session with BiblioTech

BY ALYCE

Weeks before, we were told that we would be given the opportunity to Skype a public library in San Antanio, Texas. Our class was told that it wasn’t just some library, it was an all digital library! Days before, we wrote facts and information on the white board and did tons of research. Seeing pictures, I personally thought it wasn’t real because it seemed too good to be true! Just before the Skype call, we set up two computers at our school library. One was broadcasting while the other was Skyping. Our class was anxious to see what the library would be like and who would be on the other side.

Before the call, my thoughts at first were that it was impossible, too many problems. That’s why, before we went to go talk to them, we wrote a lot of questions that we curious for answers for . As we Skyped, I wanted to go there because it seemed so new and high tech! They even had moving tables there! I think the modern look and furniture would work for Burley!

A while ago, my class had a conversation with the librarian of Bibliotech, a library in Texas that has gone completely digital.  Instead of checking out physical books, you download them onto your e-reader for a short period of time. If you don’t have an e-reader, you can check one out. But the library isn’t just for checking out books- there is a large study area with computers if you have a school project to work on, or something else. They have interactive tablets with educational games for small children, and an x-box for older kids. They even have a cafe in the library! They are one of the first libraries to go all digital, but I doubt the last. I would prefer an old-fashioned book over an e-book, but I would be fine either way. As for our school library, I don’t think it would work. It would take a lot of time and money to change over, and for a school, I don’t think it would work as well. Students take their books into class and read all the time, but you can’t do that with an e-reader, because the teacher doesn’t know if you’re actually reading or not. So for a school library, I don’t think it would be very practical, but for a public library like Bibliotech, it might just work.

 

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