Partnerships Make a Difference: Woodbrook Reads and SPCA/SDV Dogs Listen

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Community Partners Make a Difference … 

Across our schools, we have documented over 300 partnerships that benefit our young people and the staff who work with them. Our schools connect with a variety of partners to support our learners: local businesses, faith-based organizations, nonprofits, and our local college and university volunteer associations. Partners aren’t just donors to us of time, expertise and resources but our young school communities also provide resources and services to our partners as well. For example, all high school seniors participate in a variety of community service activities to provide support to organizations in our community that also need an extra pair of hands to accomplish their work. This could mean helping package donated food with the Blue Ridge Food Bank volunteers, working with United Way and Good Will projects that serve the homeless and our less advantaged community members, reading to senior citizens at a local nursing home, participating in canned food drives, or tutoring younger students after school.

 

spca6When visiting Woodbrook Elementary this past week, I had the opportunity to interact with one of our Woodbrook partners who provides a unique service in several of our schools, an SPCA/SDV volunteer with trained therapy dogs. Here’s what one teacher at Woodbrook has to say about this volunteer service to her young readers:

“I can’t tell you how much your program means to our students! They will benefit so much. Today they are already asking when they get to do it again.” Allison Greene, reading specialist from Woodbrook Elementary.

I Learned something new, too …

While this particular activity brings trained therapy dogs to the school to be good listeners to our youngest readers, I also learned that this pair of beautiful and perfectly genteel collies also bring a credential for working with children with autism.

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It was quite wonderful to see our children so engaged as young readers but also their learning about the dogs from the owner. As they gently touched one of the dog’s foot pads, I could only think that these are the experiences that close children’s learning opportunity gaps as they discussed the roughness of a dog’s foot pads and why those exist to help a dog move essentially barefoot through a variety of environments.

Principal Lisa Molinaro and I were delighted to land in the library and spend time with children, the dogs, and their owner who is a regular volunteer in the school.

Partnerships with organizations are a win for our schools. But there’s also more!

The SPCA is a great partner with us because they also benefit from our student volunteers who go there to help with walking dogs waiting to finspca8d owners, cuddling with kittens to acclimate them to human touch, and assisting with other activities that benefit the SPCA.

This past summer, Woodbrook Elementary’s summer program children worked on a project to benefit their SPCA partner, making homemade dog biscuits and cat toys to take there as gifts to the animals while also spending time with a local vet learning about pet nutrition. Woodbrook’s partnership with the local SPCA represents a great story of what it means to educate children for life, not just school.

Our children learn as they move through our schools that community is important and that giving of ourselves to community makes a difference. Our vision for all learners incorporates more than just academic success as an outcome. We also want young people who develop and sustain empathy over time and a value for community. This matters in families, our community and ultimately when our high school graduates become young adults.

Partnerships matter and we appreciate all the many ways that our children learn through our community partnerships. Thank you, Woodbrook and our Charlottesville-Albemarle SPCA for being a wonderful model of that.

To volunteer at the Charlottesville-Albemarle SPCA, email volunteer@cascpa.org

 

 

 

 

Welcome to 2016 – It’s beginning to feel a lot like winter!

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IMG_1254Welcome to 2016! I hope everyone experienced a relaxing holiday season with family and friends. We asked our staff and students to take time away from school and homework over the winter break to spend time with their families, read a good book, visit relatives, or simply do those things that families accomplish together – cleaning out a closet or repairing something around the home.

Now it’s time to get back to school and re-engage with our learners as we head toward the end of the first semester.

January also heralds two important processes for our community – inclement weather decisions and budget season engagement

Anyone who’s experienced what it means to close or delay schools is well aware of all the frustrations that snow and ice bring to our lives here in Albemarle County. We work hard to keep our schools open but if we have ice or a snow storm, it often means school closures occur even after roads are clear in the urban areas. Albemarle still is a very rural county and many roads that our buses travel are unpaved, mountainous and narrow once beyond of the urban ring and off our main highways.

I am often asked how the decision is made to close schools in winter and what helps guide the final decision. Chief operations officer, Dean Tistadt, explains the division’s school-closing decision-making process in response to winter weather in this video.

We also know that child care, work schedules, and school closures collide to create frustration for parents and employees alike even as our children sing “let it snow, let it snow, let it snow!” That’s why school closing communication is so important during the winter.

To communicate clearly, we use every media outlet possible including notifying parents as soon as possible through our electronic communications system.This can mean a late evening or early morning wake-up call communication from the school division.If you haven’t signed up for the system and wish to do so, please contact your school’s office staff as soon as possible.

Sometimes, we don’t have enough information to make an evening call. In that case, we need  spend all night monitoring multiple weather system services as well as contacting state and local public safety, VDOT, and surrounding division transportation teams. We also put our own school transportation road assessment team “boots on the ground” to assess road conditions and report in prior to a decision being made.

Around 5 am, I receive a call from Transportation Director Jim Foley and Dean Tistadt in operations and we go through the checklist of data related current and potential weather and road conditions – not just in Albemarle but also in surrounding counties (on the first day of school, I road a Stone-Robinson Elementary bus that crossed into both Fluvanna and Louisa counties. This also can happen with Nelson, Green, Orange, and Buckingham.) We together use the checklist data to make our best analysis of the potential for inclement weather, Mr. Foley makes a well thought out recommendation and only then do I decide to open or close schools.

The worst case scenario occurs when bad weather arrives after buses are on the road (drivers begin leaving to start routes often by 5:00-5:30 am) or a storm system changes course at the last moment. That’s when our team sometimes makes an early morning decision that isn’t in sync with the incoming weather despite our best deliberations. Overall, our calls have a high rate of being on target. However, we know that snow and ice sometimes defy the best meteorologists’ forecasts and we get our decision wrong as a result. However, our entire team appreciates that parents know and support that our job #1 is to always keep children. Sometimes that means we need to close school due to snow or ice.

Some important reminders:

  • Please update your child’s childcare plans after school in the event of an early closing if those have changed since the beginning of the school year. You can contact your school’s office staff to do this.
  • Make sure your child knows the current early closing plan as well as your child’s after school care provider.
  • If your child’s plans need to change after school due to an early closing, please call school office staff as soon as possible to communicate plan changes. Office phone lines stay very busy on a snow day but do not rely on email to communicate a change in plans since it may not be read in time.
  • Review transportation plans with your teen driver in the event of inclement weather. One of my greatest concerns is the accident potential associated with inexperienced teen drivers on our highways in bad weather.
  • School buses are safe transportation vehicles and our drivers routinely go through required training and each driver holds CDL commercial driver’s licenses. Our drivers are prepared to drive in bad weather.

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  • Follow us on Facebook and twitter @k12albemarle.org

 

 

 

Budget work has been in progress for months and I will do my official presentation of the 2016-17 funding request to the School Board on Tuesday, January 19. More information will be provided here in the coming weeks. Here’s a link to the budget calendar.  

 

 

 

Teachers Matter Most

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December is a busy month in our schools from wonderful holiday programs to routine activities that engage children in deep learning. I am fortunate to visit our schools and see the amazing work accomplished by our young people and the teachers who create opportunities to involve learners. Learning planned by our teachers challenges children’s imaginations, supports them to solve complex problems, engages them to seek and use deep knowledge of content and make interdisciplinary connections, and encourages them to sustain curiosity and pursue learning that is of intrinsic interest.

dec blog 2On a Sunday afternoon, I recently watched Scottsville fifth graders perform The Little Prince at Victory Hall, a community arts center in downtown Scottsville. The children enchanted the audience as they shared the story, with a parent-constructed set that was just perfect for the show. The sophisticated concepts in The Little Prince were beautifully interpreted by the children. I loved the introduction by Principal Sharon Amato- Wilcox who reminded us of one of many important lessons in this children’s story:

“And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.”
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince 

Drama teachers Fay Cunningham, Madeline Michel, and Caitlin Pitts recently hosted student drama teams from our four high schools (AHS, MoHS, WAHS, and Murray High) to participatIMG_2110e in a fast-paced “script to performance” master class, Wired, in which students began the morning writing a script from scratch and performing that evening. I had the chance to watch student teams participate in a feedback session with the teachers and afterwards we chatted with the students about how coaching and guiding drama students gives them immediate, actionable feedback on their progress which they love about drama. One student commented that he wished school could be drama class all day long every day.

dec blog 8A visit with a Sutherland Middle School science teacher, Bryan Anderson, also provided insight into the interesting work that he does with students in an outdoor environmental garden area. It’s amazing to see that some typical garden plants such as broccoli  are still producing due to the unseasonably warm weather. His recycled soda bottle irrigation system seems to work well – and the rabbits who live in a hutch nearby and are a great source of fertilizer. It’s not every day you see kids inspecting cotton in a school garden with the intention of sharing it with their social studies teacher as an artifact from early agricultural days- but Brian and his kids are willing to try out all kinds of experiments in their schoolyard garden.

This past Saturday, Stone-Robinson Elementary staff hosted a #girlsgeekday program. I visited and saw around 60 elementary-aged girls working with volunteer staff, mostly women, including a number of teachers. The girls were figuring out how to program Lego robots, use basic code, design and build structures to withstand high winds, create animation videos, and program with visual patterns to control Ozobots. Watching our elementary girls work with great delight on STEM projects all Saturday morning reinforced how important it is to support all of our young people to see themselves as capable designers, builders, engineers, programmers, mathematicians, and creators. A takeaway? when children find learning interesting, they are intrinsically motivated to keep going.

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I also found out this past weekend about an AHS jazz band accomplishment. After completing and submitting a jazz tape made with support from the A3 House music studio in the Albemarle High Learning Commons, our jazz musicians were notified that they had been selected as one of twelve high school jazz bands across the nation to attend the prestigious Savannah Jazz Festival this coming April. Our AHS jazz musicians are some of the very best in the nation under the direction of Greg Thomas and this video shows why they are considered as such.

Finally, I’m proud that Albemarle County Public Schools was recently notified of its #5 school division Niche ranking in Virginia. Notably, our teaching staff received the highest rating possible which corroborates my belief that our teachers advance learning in powerful ways and that’s recognized by parents and students alike. While I want all of our young people to have excellent, modern facilities and top-notch learning tools, I also know that teaching quality makes the real difference in a child’s success in school. Commitment to learning quality must supersede other investments. Recruiting, selecting and developing the best educators we can find has led to our recognition of our young people and those who serve them well.

Schools matter. Learning tools matter. Teachers matter most.

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Looking for Learning: School Visits to #acps

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Looking in classrooms of today reveals changes in tools, teaching, and learning.

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Read, Design, Engineer

This past week I observed elementary children programming Arduino controllers to turn LED lights on and off. In doing so they researched in technical manuals to figure out how to first connect their circuitry and bread boards together and then set up code to activate the Arduinos. When I visited a middle school class, I watched a teacher working with a specialist to figure out how to use a laser cutter so that students could incorporate this new tool into designing, engineering, and building projects in what once was a traditional shop class. But a visit today makes the point to me that it’s definitely not your father’s shop class. While students do continue to learn to use traditional shop tools such as a lathe or a drill press they put new tools such as 3-D printers and laser cutters in their tool “boxes”, too.

A photo posted by @gschoppa on

Our educational times are changing. 

When I walked into an engineering class in one of our high schools, a student 3-D prints  parts for a working U-Boat replica while another student focuses on figuring out controller code to fly quad-copters in formation. These learning experiences are ones that radically differ from what young people were accomplishing in high school just a few years ago.

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Inquire, research, make

When I visit our schools and see teachers and young people at work, I look for our students’ work to acquire competencies of lifelong learning – a key focus for students graduating from our high schools that moves them beyond passing required courses and tests of Virginia standards. Providing a variety of choices for students to pursue paths to learning is key. While most of our graduates will go into post-secondary education to acquire four-year or two-year degrees or credentials, we know young people will enter a rapidly changing workforce. We know that some jobs will remain important but others will be wiped out by the rise of technologies that will replace jobs we take for granted today. Focusing on citizenship, post-secondary education, and workforce capability are all critical to our children’s education. Understanding the dynamic of coming changes that will result from evolving technologies is a must to educate our young people well.

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write, create, perform

What’s needed to prepare young people to transition into an adulthood that will bring even more challenges to staying current as lifelong learners? In Albemarle, we believe those skills include both traditions of literate and mathematical thinking but also the capability to create not just consume, to design and make, to pose questions and search for needed information across media, to communicate and collaborate with others to find solutions and complete projects.  We also believe its important for students to lead fit and active lifestyles and sustain wellness as they move into adulthood. We label this work in and out of our classrooms as lifelong learning competencies.To accomplish our goals, we see arts, sciences, social studies, language arts, mathematics, world languages, and physical fitness and wellness as remaining important.

Teachers plan for students to engage in work that leads to these competencies.

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Team 19 students working on interdisciplinary video documentaries.

We assess performance through projects, tasks, and products that represent this work. Our principals look for this work when they observe students and teachers working across our instructional programs. Instructional coaches and learning tech integration specialists assist teachers with professional learning so that strategies that support integration of lifelong learning along with conceptual understanding, knowledge acquisition and skill development embedded in standards-based curricula.

Work to develop lifelong learning competencies can’t be done in isolation of excellent teaching, integration of a variety of learning technologies, and effective assessments of what we expect our young people to learn whether age 8 or 18. This kind of teaching demands that young people analyze, apply, and create as they process what they learn. This kind of learning represents integration of interdisciplinary content that supports students to use skills and knowledge being learned across the curricula.

Uboat

The U-boat project unfolds history, math, science, and language arts

Reading complicated technical manuals leads to programming Arduinos. Creating a U-boat leads to research about the role of new technologies in World War II and history of naval warfare. Figuring out how to use a laser cutter creates potential to connect the arts, sciences, and technical education.

Just as in other sectors, public and private, our educators today are pressed to learn new skills and incorporate changes into practice at a faster pace than we could have imagined in the twentieth century. Ensuring that our young people leave us prepared for what comes next in their lives demands our attention and time. That’s why we must sustain openness to learning even as we expect that of our children.

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Arts and Communication

Biology students take to the water

sciences and fitness

Using Math to CAD program

mathematics and social studies

 

Just Around the Corner: A New School Year Begins

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3 clarinetsAll of a sudden, it’s time to begin school again. Our schools are almost ready. Floors shine. Open Houses are planned. Renovations and modernization work are coming to closure. Buses are washed, gassed and ready to roll. New teachers began last week and experienced teachers return this week. Athletes and band students have begun to practice for fall activities.

We are excited to welcome about 13,500 children to our 26 schools on August 19.

We Have an app for that!

acpsappTo keep track of school activities in our schools, school calendar activities, and updated announcements, consider downloading our Albemarle County Public Schools app  (Albemarle County PS) for your android or iPhone at Apple Apps Store or at Google play.

 

It’s been a busy summer across Albemarle County Public Schools for our teachers. 

School had barely ended in June and we convened almost 300 teachers and principals in school leadership teams to work on curricula, assessment, and instruction. Teachers explored multiple strategies to engage learners in active, deep learning. They worked on designing paths for children and teens to engage in problem-solving and project research that leads to hands-on and collaboration experiences. Teachers together across grade levels, content areas, and even schools created opportunities for students to design, create, engineer, build, and make when they start the 2015-16 School Year. Throughout July, almost all teachers participated in professional development and training to prepare for changes in curricular content, review assessments, extend tech skills, and build instructional units.

2 new teachersThen, our new teachers, 130 strong, arrived last week to get ready to work with our learners, build teams, and meet experienced mentor teachers, instructional coaches, and tech learning integration specialists.

 

 

Here’s one example of a unit two fourth teachers designed this summer. Imagine the teachers introducing their children to a variety of tools to help them research how insects benefit the planet. Consider the children completing research that leads them to plant flower beds at school that will attract insects.

using data

using data

Think about those fourth graders first collecting data and observations on insect visitors (especially bees) to their flowers; then making a communications plan to persuade families and our greater community to plant native plants that are bee-friendly. This teacher-designed unit supports fourth graders to acquire lifelong learning skills. Through interdisciplinary studies that integrate math, writing, reading, science, and geography, these young students will pursue questions and sustain curiosity culminating in projects designed to deepen their learning.

And, it’s been a busy summer across Albemarle County Public Schools for our students.4 leadership

Our principals have worked as if school never ended and that’s no surprise given the number of programs we’ve run for children throughout the summer. Even as they’ve worked on schedules, class assignments, and planning, they’ve been working with summer programming attended by students. As I’ve visited schools, it’s been wonderful to see how positive and supportive our young people are with each other, particularly given the multi-age nature of our summer activities.

  • 10 maker sewElementary and middle schools sponsored summer maker and project-based learning programs in every school.
  • Our first elementary arts “Sight and Sound” academy ran at Baker-Butler.
  • The Coder Dojo Academy again ran at AHS serving over 600 K-12 students participating in learning to code and create wearable LED art.
  • Teen leaders gathered in our Leadership Academy at the County Office Building to plan ways to empower student voices across our high schools. 8 coderdojo
  • Our regional Fine Arts Academy at Burley Middle School added a fourth jazz band this summer to meet student interest – and we ran full sessions in creative writing, drama, and visual arts.
  • Our newest Rock and Rap Academy at AHS overflowed with kids. 6th -12th grade, all set on one goal – to compose and perform pop music.
  • African-American middle school males in our M-Cubed Academy worked on algebra and geometry projects at Burley.6 rock and rap
  • Bridge building middle school girl geeks convened in the woods near the Rivanna River with MESA Academy support and spent a week engineering and constructing a bridge across the river.
  • Children in the English as Second Language Program participated in a Community Immersion program to visit historical sites across the region.
  • Special Education students had opportunities to participate in  support programs designed to sustain key skills across the summer. 9 PK camp
  • Kindergarteners, sixth graders, and ninth graders attended pre-school activities designed to help them make positive transitions into new schools.
  • Summer interns worked with our tech support staff to set up new laptops and re-image our existing student technologies.

 We’ve had a wonderful summer.

Now, the start of school is just around the corner. We look forward to a year of positive experiences for our students, their teachers, and our school communities. Welcome!

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May: A Month for Creativity

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Robot Builders at Broadus Wood Elementary

“A new study from Michigan State University found that childhood participation in arts and crafts leads to innovation, patents, and increases the odds of starting a business as an adult. The researchers found that people who own businesses or patents received up to eight times more exposure to the arts as children than the general public.” (C. Bergland in “Creativity in Childhood Leads to Innovation in Adulthood”, Psychology Today.)

Why should we make sure that our young people have deep opportunities to exercise creativity in learning activities in every way? In Psychology Today, author Christopher Bergland spells out recent research detailing why sustaining creativity matters and how creative experiences prior to age 14 impact students in college and in their future financial opportunities in the workforce. It’s worth a read.

When children are afforded the opportunity of experiencing creativity through learning, they explore and discover new ideas, different solutions, alternative paths of designing and making, and a variety of media applications through which they can share their creativity. The chance to create allows children to integrate thinking driven by their own curiosity and interest with the opportunity to design, build, make, engineer, and compose – the ultimate hands-on learning experience. For example, when teens were given the challenge to demonstrate physics concepts in a high school class recently, one student decided to build a PVC pipe keyboard to explore sound.

Western Albemarle Physics

 

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Young art designers build in Meriwether Lewis Elementary

In our schools this month is a time in which our students demonstrate lifelong learning competencies in performances, culminating projects, competitions such as Destination Imagination, school-wide and community exhibitions, and portfolio compilations. It’s a time to celebrate the talents and capabilities of our students as they show achievement in a variety of ways and explore possibilities in their learning.

 

GIS

Where Should NBA teams be located?
AHS GIS project

Despite standardized testing in May, our musicals, concerts, and plays show off our students’ creativity. Learners bring creativity to bear through project-based learning and in products they’ve made as they share their accomplishments in class presentations and school-wide festivals and fairs. They even post to YouTube and on websites where their creativity projects are broadcast to the world.

Our students create across all the disciplines they study in school from math to writing. We know it’s not possible to measure the quality of their 3-D printed sculptures, GIS projects, self-portraits, Minecraft historical sites, slam poetry, choreographed dances, documentary films or simple machine inventions through multiple choice tests so we provide opportunities for students to show not just their teachers but the whole community what they can do. We know creative learning opportunities engage and empower our youth through contemporary learning. However, now we know the pay off is much bigger than just for today.

Why create? Because it matters for a lifetime.

Monticello Drama’s West Side Story

The Funding Challenge: Sustaining Our Portfolio of Educational Excellence

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Funding from the Commonwealth for K-12 education has dropped over the past seven years. This drop has shifted the burden of responsibility for education in Albemarle and other localities to local taxpayers’ property taxes. If per pupil revenues from the state had remained flat over this time period, Albemarle County Public Schools would have no funding gap in the 2015-16 funding request because we would receive $3.8 million in additional state revenues for FY16. This is not the case. The current revenue gap for the school division is $2.7 million. This creates a challenge for the Board to sustain commitments to quality programming, growth needs, and excellent staff to serve the 13,500 students enrolled in our schools.

Past Board investments in a Portfolio of Educational Excellence have allowed us to sustain commitments to programs, staff, and students so that we didn’t fall behind either market-competitive compensation or program services to students. Today, Pk-12 programs serve young people well because of past investments to recruit and retain a top-notch workforce.

However, the current FY16 funding request challenges our capability to both keep up with market-driven staff compensation while continuing to sustain and enhance the educational services that our community values and supports. This means that past cuts and reductions in funding allocations impact to such an extent that we are faced with the need to catch up in these areas :

  • salary compensation and benefits coverage,

  • purchase of learning resources,

  • facilities and classroom modernization in areas such as science labs,

  • professional development and training to develop and extend content and teaching expertise.

It’s important to realize that we cannot keep up current services when revenues do not move apace with the costs of inflation, compensation and benefit expenses, growth, and directed/mandated services.

Sustaining the Board’s market-compensation commitment to staff is the top priority expressed by every demographic group surveyed earlier in the school year. Due to revenue gaps, staff likely will not receive Human Resources’ recommended market-competitive salary increase – unless more funding becomes available. Instead, a phased-in raise during the 2015-16 School Year is the likely action.

Take home pay is less today than it was five years ago for teachers and other staff including those working in local government. Like others experiencing wage stagnation, our educators are finding it difficult to make ends meet as health insurance costs rise, Virginia Retirement System changes have taken a big bite out of paychecks, and cost of living adjustments remain nonexistent. This isn’t just a problem here. It’s occurring all over the United States. The recession has impacted education. Today, fewer college students are choosing to major in education, practitioners are switching to more lucrative careers, and the boomers are exiting the profession to retirement. While this might not impact today or tomorrow, this trend has deep implications for the future of a strong educational workforce here in our community.

Why should we ALL care about sustaining commitment to excellent schools, to supporting breadth of programs that serve young people, and hiring the best educators we can find?

Our Portfolio of Educational Excellence represents the core values of a premier community with one of the overall highest educational levels in the United States. The capability of higher education and the business community to attract top employees and develop the local economy is dependent upon excellent public schools. The quality of our schools impacts Albemarle real estate values. However, the most important reason why we need to sustain our programs, services, class sizes, and competitive market walks through our school doors every day.

Our children.

What have past Boards and our community considered as valuable investments in our Portfolio of Educational Excellence over the last two decades?

  • We have implemented a competitive market strategy to recruit and retain excellent Albemarle teachers by paying at the bottom of the top quartile of a competitive market which includes contiguous counties and selected counties in northern, Tidewater, Richmond area, and southwest Virginia.
  • Our schools have some of the smallest average class sizes in Virginia – ranking us in the top tier of small class sizes among the elite northern Virginia divisions and the Charlottesville City Schools that represent the highest per pupil expenses in the state. For comparison, Albemarle County Schools rank 1st in elementary, fourth in middle school, and third in high school class sizes despite per pupil expenses that are the third lowest in this cohort performance benchmark group.

IMG_0682Students take advantage of a comprehensive K-12 arts program that is recognized at the local, state and national level as one of the best, including the addition of a new secondary summer fine arts academy in 2014. While many divisions have reduced arts commitments, Albemarle’s School Board has sustained visual and performing programs.

 

  • The K-12 physical education program taught by licensed PE staff represents both the time and activities necessary for young people to build lifelong wellness and fitness knowledge and skills.

IMG_41006-12 AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) services supports over 300 students who will be first generation college students, providing courses to build skills, knowledge and strategies essential to performing at high levels in college preparatory classes with mentoring support typical among college-educated families.

wahsDifferentiated high school academy options allow young people to pursue specific interests such as health and medical sciences, engineering, and environmental studies during the regular year and visual/fine arts, computer programming, and leadership during the summer.

  • Comprehensive college curricula includes a broad offering of advanced placement and dual enrollment courses open to students who wish to pursue college credits in high school.

DI robotsNumerous gifted and talented and general enrichment options include robotics, Destination Imagination, National History Day, Westinghouse Science Fair, UVA Writers’ Eye, Governors’ Schools, VHSL competitive activities from drama to athletics, and so much more.

 

  • Nationally recognized K-12 library programs and facilities offer contemporary access to research, communication resources, and activities that allow libraries to be open and accessible to students and staff to search, connect, communicate and make learning.

IMG_9532A  6-12 contemporary Career and Technical Education lab program addresses both the interests and needs of students who will enter future workforces – with focus on developing transportable life skills that are important in school, at home, and at work. A lab school partnership with UVa, the Smithsonian, and Charlottesville City Schools offers middle school students an interdisciplinary STEM curricula.

  • The division’s nationally recognized instructional coaching model provides pedagogical and content development support directly to teachers with particular focus on mentoring and assisting novice teachers. This program is part of a package of strategies to help recruit, develop and retain excellent teachers, a return on investment.

  • The Board’s commitment sustains a value for community schools so children are educated as close to where they live as possible.
  • The Division values its partnership with local government as we together capture efficiencies through shared services and activities in Human Resources, Finance, Transportation, Technology, Pre-Kindergarten, the Comprehensive Services Act for special education, and Legal Services to the Board.

CATEC buildersSustained community partnerships offer extended learning opportunities for students through Piedmont Virginia Community College, the University of Virginia, the Charlottesville- Albemarle Tech Ed Center (Charlottesville Schools), private sector businesses and corporations, and community agencies.

 

  • A pilot elementary world languages program at Cale Elementary adds depth to the opportunities for young children to learn a second language when their brains are most receptive to developing language competencies.
  • Pk-12 intervention and prevention services address economically disadvantaged children who may enter school with learning gaps, English as Second Language Learners, handicapped learners, potential dropouts, and students with mental health and emotional needs.

Monticello High Music Industry Class Writes Lyrics and Records Music

Top performance by Albemarle students in arts, academics, and athletics has led to a graduates who excel by any measure. The total drop out rate for students in the class of 2014 of 2.3% represents a total of just twenty-three students who dropped out of school between ninth and twelfth grade. Our recent graduates were accepted at close to 300 different colleges and universities including 20 of the 25 top private and 21 of the top 25 public colleges and universities in the nation.

Excellence is a hallmark of our community’s public schools, representing the investments of generations who have lived here in Albemarle County. Public education is a heritage for our community going back to its roots in the earliest decades of United States history. Mr. Jefferson saw the need for public education and he influenced the state and nation to embrace public schooling. Why? He knew that public education was essential to a strong and thriving citizenry.

Here in a county that set in motion the birth of the United States of America, it seems only appropriate that today we should be a model for educating all of our young people well – boys, girls, children of color, the handicapped, the immigrants.

Monticello Jan. 14. 18.

“A system of general instruction, which shall reach every description of our citizens, from the richest to the poorest, as it was the earliest, so will it be the latest, of all the public concerns in which I shall permit myself to take an interest.”  Thomas Jefferson to Joseph C, Cabell

 

 

3-D Printing: a Contemporary Learning Tool in #ACPS

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I like to feature educators and students from across Albemarle County Public Schools to illustrate the innovative work in which our teachers and learners engage. 3-D printing is becoming a workforce tool in ways that I would never have envisioned four years ago. From printing “one-hour” crowns for teeth in dental offices to orthopedic implants, this tool of advanced manufacturing is changing the world of work, medicine, and even homes. Just google 3-D printing!Our middle and high schools all have 3-D printers that teachers are using with students for a variety of design purposes in STEM+ activities. Students with access to 3-D printers use math, engineering, tech, and science skills but also content and competencies from the arts, history, and language arts. I’ve seen mouthpieces for band instruments, a working telegraph, parts for a Sailbot, pulleys, and geometric equations printed in 3-D. Young people use 3-D printers in our schools as tools for learning how to design, engineer, create, and build. As children and teens use these tools, they practicing and develop contemporary workforce competencies of collaboration, creative problem-solving, critical reasoning and communication, not just learning content. They are becoming more capable because of excellent teachers who support them as learners. And, we know this learning can’t be captured on a multiple choice test. Instead, the work our learners produce in 3-D fits well with both traditional projects and performance assessments.

Chris Shedd, Burley sixth grade teacher, represents the cutting edge of STEM + social studies work that’s possible because of access to a 3-D printer. Here’s a post Mr. Shedd wrote to share his sixth graders’ projects.

3D Printing in Social Studies by Chris Shedd, Burley Middle

photo6photo7 photo8 Burley students are mastering 3D printing technology. They are researching and creating 3D models to enhance their learning, collaborate with another local middle school, and even to help a group of college students. The 3D printer offers a great opportunity for students to develop new technology skills and to use their creativity.

Last semester students began using a 3D printer in my social studies class. Students researched and created 3D models of structures including Jamestown, Monticello, the Rotunda, the Mayflower, and Burley. One student created an almost exact replica of a specific Civil War bullet. Nine Burley students attended the Tom Tom festival to show off their work to the public. Many students made 3D models for their Creative Projects and researched their historical significance.

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This semester we have an exciting partnership with an 8th grade class at Sutherland Middle School. Burley students are going to research and recreate spy gear from the American Revolution. Sutherland students are going to look at modern spy gear and some of the science behind it. We are hoping to have our classes Skype with each other, share what we have learned, and discuss how spy gear has changed over time.

Burley students are also creating models from natural history for Randolph College in Lynchburg, VA. Randolph’s Natural History Collection is considering buying a 3D printer and scanner. They want to scan items from their collection and paint them. They have asked Burley students to create 3D examples to test their paints. So far students have created a snail, a trilobite, fossilized dragonfly, a crab, and a lobster. Three copies of the snail have already made it to Randolph College, and they liked it so much they have requested more copies. Mrs. Schoppa, Burley design and engineering class teacher, has been helping us keep up with the printing of objects. I am hoping some of her students will create models for Randolph as well.

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All students have modeling software on their computers. I encourage students who are interested to download Autodesk 123 D. It is a free, basic CAD program. Give it a try!

 

An Inside View from a Student Teacher: Starting the School Year

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How do new professionals learn a set of skills, routines, and knowledge necessary to success? 

Whether it’s the field of medicine, banking, automotive maintenance or teaching, students in those fields learn as much or more on the job in intern or residency experiences with experts as they do sitting in classrooms. The apprenticeship always has been a key way that expertise is transmitted forward from one generation to the next.

Student teachers learn on the job as apprentices with Albemarle’s top teachers. Here’s one example of many.

Yarden Batson, student teacher at Meriwether Lewis Elementary with master teacher Anne Straume, shares her perspective on what she learned as she watched and assisted Mrs. Straume in the first week of school.

First Week of School

by Yarden Batson, University of Virginia student teacher

This week of school was one in which I learned how to set-up the classroom, h“>ow to become a part of a professional learning community (PLC), how to start establishing a community of   learners, and how to create authentic lessons that motivate students to have high expectations for themselves.community (PLC), how to start establishing a community of learners, and how to create authentic lessons that motivate students to have high expectations for themselves.

After almost a week of planning I was excited to meet the students. They walked in on the first day of school ready to learn. Many of the students were excited to see friends they haven’t seen in a while as well as meet students who are new to the school.These first few days of school required a lot of planning and creativity. My teacher and I want to design authentic learning experiences for the students as well as create a community in which all students’ strengths are used. We want to motivate all of our students to work their hardest and learn that they have the power to achieve great things and make positive changes in the world around them.I taught my first few lessons this week as well as observed as the teacher encouraged struggling students, went over expectations, and modeled appropriate classroom behavior. I feel so lucky to have a teacher, who is so well-loved and so enthusiastic about her students, model and guide me through this experience.I am looking forward to a wonderful semester of student teaching!

Below are some pictures from “Open House” and a sneak peek into what we are planning for the semester.

Why We Are Here: Albemarle Schools 2014-15

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This summer I had the opportunity to observe young learners and teachers working in a variety of settings across our community. From teens exploring what it means to be an “everyday” leader through community service to elementary engineers and programmers, I noticed learners who engaged and excelled in their work.

Staff in our schools understand that achievement gaps often begin with opportunity gaps. We are committed to providing year-round programs and pathways that close opportunity gaps for students. Whether it’s the work we are doing to revamp Career and Technical Education, extend customized options such as our academy model and charter schools, add fine arts pathways that provide more in-depth exploration of creative potential, or offer accelerated options such as the M-Cubed program, we believe that we need to keep working on as many ways as possible to reach every child so that gaps in educational opportunities do not limit their potential.

It’s why we are here.

avid AVID is one such program, In Albemarle, our AVID program has grown in 8 years from serving a handful of students to serving several hundred. Today, teachers with AVID training are in all middle and high schools aiming to make sure that our young people, especially those who are the first generation in their families to go to college, are well prepared to do so. We aim to beat the odds that a student will drop out of college or spend too many years attempting to graduate. It’s an issue of concern for our nation and  state.   

Why AVID Makes a Difference ….   By:

Kathryn Baylor, principal
Peter Henning, asst principal

For years, educators and education reformers have cited the achievement gap as the greatest challenge facing public education in America.  Some have gone so far as to refer to the achievement gap as the greatest civil rights issue of our time.  As the years have passed, closing the achievement gap appeared increasingly impossible.  There were too many contributing factors, from poverty to violent neighborhoods to fractured homes.

avid

AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) offers a real solution to the achievement gap.  AVID is a worldwide college and workforce readiness system that serves close to 700,000 students across the globe.  With an instructional focus on writing, inquiry, collaboration, organization, and reading, AVID helps prepare students for success in high school, college, and beyond.  The AVID elective class provides an additional layer of support for students, largely from low-income and minority backgrounds, who show the potential to become first generation college students.

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AVID is a phenomenal investment for a school.  The national network of AVID schools and staff offers some of the best professional development available in public education.  The AVID system also serves as a no-frills, no-nonsense model with proven success for schools and school divisions committed to closing the achievement gap.

 

AVID students gain acceptance to four-year colleges at a rate that is nearly 3 times greater than their peers across the nation.  This holds true for students across all demographics, from African American to White to Latino.  AVID students are succeeding, and at an astounding rate.

AVID is not magic.  AVID is great teaching, and hard work, and commitment.  AVID works.